NPC says personalized spam texts unlikely from data aggregators

The National Privacy Commission (NPC) has ruled out data aggregators as the source of the recent wave of spam text messages that contain the recipient’s names.

In a statement, NPC said data aggregators are unlikely to be the source of the targeted smishing messages, noting that the texts appear to have been sent using specific mobile numbers registered to certain texting services.

NPC explained that smishing messages which are sent using mobile numbers are possible through a phone-to-phone (P2P) transmission.

Such transmission is usually coursed through a telecommunication company’s regular network and does not pass through data aggregators, NPC said.

Contrary to a P2P transmission, NPC said data aggregators use an application-to-phone or A2P transmission, wherein messages received through this transmission will not appear to have come from specific mobile numbers.

Instead, it will come from a sender that has SMS ID which identifies the data aggregator, or the brand or business name using the data aggregator’s services, according to the NPC.

The NPC assured it is working closely with telecommunications companies in formulating countermeasures against the recent wave of targeted smishing messages.

Bilyonaryo.com has also become a victim of these fraudulent activities, with the organization’s name being included in scam and spam text messages offering fake raffle.

Bilyonaryo.com emphasizes to its readers that it is not behind these flood of scam and spam text messages.

“The Bilyonaryo respects our readers and will never attempt to dupe or cause you any harm. Just like you, our website is a victim in this nefarious act,” it said.

Bilyonaryo urges recipients of these fraudulent texts to immediately report it to their network providers and regulators.

DOE raises RE utilization percentage for on-grid areas

The Department of Energy (DOE) has increased the percentage of the utilization of renewable energy for on-grid areas from one percent to 2.52 percent in line with the administration’s goal of transitioning towards a sustainable and clean energy future.