Leandro Leviste’s mantra comes from his family’s property roots: ‘Don’t wait to buy land, buy land and wait’

Solar Philippines Nueva Ecija Corp. (SPNEC) is geared for investors looking to ride on the renewable energy bandwagon. But for its millennial bilyonaryo owner, SPNEC is a property play.

Leandro Leviste feels vindicated after winning big in PH’s first clean energy auction

Leondro Leviste, SPNEC chairman, president and CEO, revealed that his end goal in assembling the biggest solar farm in the country is the massive payoff from land appreciation.

”It’s (biggest source of value is) on buying land at 200 pesos per square meter, and revaluing it once it’s industrial to 1,000 pesos per square meter, and infusing it into equity for a joint venture which would have a present value of 2,000 pesos per square meter. That’s how we can turn one peso into ten pesos over time,” said Leviste in an interview with Forbes.

Leandro Leviste big winner in DOE’s green auction program

“We’re accumulating land left and right, but might just end up with cattle-raising as a business,” said Leviste, whose family has accumulated thousands of hectares of farm and pasture properties. His goal is to accumulate up to 10,000 hectares of land strategically located near transmission lines.

Leviste said his devotion to land acquisition came from his father, former Batangas Governor Tony Leviste, who acquired land in Makati in the 1970s at around P100 per square meter.

Leandro Leviste offers to contract Solar PH’s 10 GW solar power projects

“I grew up being taught, ‘Don’t wait to buy land, buy land and wait’, ” said Leviste.

NGO blames drop in aquaculture production on PAP imports ban

Tugon Kabuhayan, a nongovernment organization advocating for food security and sustainable food production, has blamed the decline in aquaculture production in the second quarter on the import ban on processed animal proteins (PAPs) which was recently lifted by the Department of Agriculture.

NGO blames drop in aquaculture production on PAP imports ban

Tugon Kabuhayan, a nongovernment organization advocating for food security and sustainable food production, has blamed the decline in aquaculture production in the second quarter on the import ban on processed animal proteins (PAPs) which was recently lifted by the Department of Agriculture.